Policy

Annual Plan Hearings

Annual Plan Hearings

In order for New York to be a fair city for all ages, the DFTA service system must be financially supported at levels reflective of the needs it serves. At a time of historical demographic increases for the aging population, the DFTA budget is well under 1% of the city budget…

Changes in the delivery of health care services

While services such as senior centers, home-delivered meals or affordable senior housing with services are non-medical by definition, their impact has a uniquely positive effect on the overall health of a senior and a reduction in costs that would otherwise be imposed to our healthcare system. For example, data has shown that the majority of the seniors that go to a senior center receive more than half of their daily nutritional intake from meals they eat at the center.

The work of community based service providers also has significant health impacts from lowering rates of depression, to preventing isolation, to even reducing hospitalization rates for older adults, and more. For example, given that studies now show that loneliness surpasses obesity as an early predictor of morbidity, the ability for senior centers to provide socialization opportunities is key to combating this risk-factor.

LiveOn NY in the News!

LiveOn NY in the News!

At LiveOn NY, we work hard to make sure that the public hears about the issues affecting older New Yorkers, as well as the incredible momentum that exists as we grow old. To this aim, we are proud of each and every time we are able to share this narrative with the press and our local communities.

Testimony: NYC Council Finance Committee Public Hearing

Testimony: NYC Council Finance Committee Public Hearing

The city’s budget reflects its priorities.  For New York City to truly be the fairest big city, fairness must extend across the lifespan. The Department for the Aging (DFTA) budget accounts for less than ½ of 1% of the total city budget despite the fact that older adults are the fastest growing demographic…

More Than 300 Seniors Came to City Hall for LiveOn NY's 23rd Annual Aging Advocacy Day

More Than 300 Seniors Came to City Hall for LiveOn NY's 23rd Annual Aging Advocacy Day

On the 23rd anniversary of LiveOn NY’s Aging Advocacy Day, 300 older adults from over 100 senior centers, NORCs and other programs converged on City Hall and met with 43 Councilmembers to talk about how senior services fuel their communities.  Older New Yorkers are the fastest growing population in the City. From 2000 to 2030 their numbers will double to 1.84 million, about one in five New Yorkers. Current resources do not allow senior services staff to connect with the broad array of needs of ever changing immigrant groups, diverse populations and caregivers…